Jul 042010
 

In the past ten months, the staff and myself have had the honor of working with this client on levels of personal, psychological, mental and emotional dynamics.  Often times, we’ve experienced the arduous tasks of crisis management, addiction intervention and mental breakdowns with Mr. Anonymous.  In the fields of addiction, psychology and psychiatry, this is referred to as Co-Occurring Disorders.  When an individual is experiencing the burdens of functioning a healthy lifestyle with Co-Occurring Disorders, a system of monitoring by professionals must be set in place until the individual is psychologically stabilized and cognitively functioning in manner that is safe and productive.  Anonymous client’s history of Co-Occurring Disorders is very extensive and according to key members of the client’s family, this is has been challenging since Anonymous client’s childhood.

Even though, the guidelines of Mr.

Client’s trust is designed to transcend funding towards future generations, it is unreasonable to expect Mr. Client to be responsible for offspring, future generations or even to develop a healthy relationship with a woman to bear children.  The main focus with the Client’s family ought to be with the welfare of the client!  I’m sure the Client’s father would have agreed with this advice.  After all, the family’s legacy is directly related to addressing Anonymous Client’s Co-Occurring Disorders.

After reviewing all the reports from the treatment professionals concerning the client, we strongly suggest pursuing an appointed companion that will oversee the client’s day-to-day affairs and responsibilities.  The appointed companion will be responsible for the client’s doctor visits, physical well-being, life skills development, personal finances, social etiquette and career management.

 The sober living staff and management is certainly prepared to addressed the needs for the client under the direction of the family.

Letter from a case manager to a family
Jun 052010
 

It took me many years and leaving no stone unturned to get to that “breaking point” where I was willing to admit I had a problem.  Not a problem with drugs and alcohol but a problem living without drugs and alcohol.  I was pretty much a garbage can at the end of my using.  I would do anything that anyone had to use.  I was living on the streets some nights high on meth-amphetamins so I didn’t have to sleep, or I was nodding out on someones couch that would let me in because I had enough heroin to get them high also.  It was a miserable existence coming from an upper class family and all my life having everything that I ever needed and more.  Before I created enough chaos to no longer be welcome in either my families household I fought everything tooth and nail with both parents.  I had to get to a point where I didn’t have any other choices and eventually I did.  I had been running from my problems for about three years and really had no where else to turn.  I fancied myself a bit of a hustler thinking that if I just could make one big score things would be alright.  Eventually my actions ended me up in jail facing some sever criminal charges and I finally got to a point where I was willing to ask for help.

I think that point was crucial for me, having always thought that if people would just get off my back and let me use the way I wanted to use I would be alright.  That breaking point came when I was sitting in jail for the 4th time that year and this time they weren’t going to let me out.  I had been to drug treatment before and didn’t think that was going to work but I also didn’t know what really was going to work.  I knew I couldn’t keep living the way I was living without some serious consequences, which at the time I was already facing.

I reached out to a family member and asked them what I should do and if they could help me.  They were well trained in the arts of Alanon and basically told me that I had no other option but to go back to rehab.  During my first few months in that treatment center I was basically bogged down with legal commitments and it’s kept a good sense of fear in me to just do what I was told to do.  It was exactly what I needed unfortunately.  This healthy fear kept me willing to do the things that were suggested and when I was released from that rehab I managed to get on the right path.  I hope everyone gets a chance to sober up if they have a drug or alcohol program, I even think that people outside

the program could really use

the 12-steps.

Eric P.

May 212010
 

Letter to a Case Manager:

Friday dinner with my parents, three brothers, my sister and brother in law and daughter Ashley was an evening I will always cherish.  I do not recall ever being as vulnerable and honest.  It was freeing.  I shared with them my feelings as I never have in my life.  I felt strong.  There is a peace in my soul. My work at Seasons is not a dream.  I did not betray myself with my family. I am authentic.

I am a real person no longer split off from my self.  I am in tune with myself, my family and God.  I am a real person.  I have my Self back with me.  I am a happy man. I am a man.  For the first time in my life ” I Am”.   Tonight at our Shaver cabin I did not rehearse my comments.  I expressed myself in a new and fresh way.  Oh my dear sweet God I am not locked up.  I am not being smothered by inner shame and endless doubt. My heart is full.

I’m alive.  I will sleep soundly tonight. Wow…I have tears of gratitude and faith and no shame. Kevin…..the real Kevin